Strong stuff



Burns Night is inescapable at this time of year.  From the ethical, locally sourced produce at Earthy to the mass market of major supermarket chains, haggis is all around.

I was interested to read a report on the BBC website that authentic haggis is a banned foodstuff in the USA.   The problem is one of its ingredients - lungs.  So when I was doing the supermarket shop today I did a quick ingredient check and sure enough, lungs are the first-named item.  

I was amused by the usual nanny-state instruction, 'Ensure product is pip[ing hot before serving].'  I liked to think that it might say instead 'Ensure product is piped in before serving.' 
 

Oh dear, I am such a bad blogger at the moment.  I have several excuses, one of which I'll show you shortly.

Comments

  1. I do love haggis - I was bad though and never celebrated Rabbie Burns and had a pizza instead! I've never actually looked at the ingredients before, although I knew it was a list of undesirables - hasn't put me off - still tastes good though! :)

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    1. I think Burns might have been partial to a pizza! We didn't celebrate at home either, tho daughter was playing clarsach and singing Burns songs at her university Burns supper.

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  2. Probably it is best to eat and not read the ingredients! ;-)

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    1. Yes, although I knew what haggis contains it hasn't helped me warm to it as a result of reading the ingredients and seeing them set out in black and white.

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  3. Yep - sometimes it's best not to know the ingredients! That's how I feel about hot dogs. :)

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    1. Ooh yes, hot dogs also have scope for mystery ingredients!

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  4. I must admit that I have not tried Haggis!

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    1. We're fans of the vegetarian variety, but my children's school serves the real thing for school lunches and most of the children love it.

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  5. Tatties is a new one for me. I have been calling them tators since watching the Lord of the Rings movies. Spuds works sometime. But we have never had a different name for them but potatoes. I guess fries and chips are two other names we all share.

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    1. Tatties is the classic Scots name for potatoes. Your 'fries' are our 'chips', and your 'chips' are our 'crisps'!

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  6. I must admit, and I apologize if I offend your Scottish sensibilities, but I find the idea of eating lungs rather off-putting. I think it's something you have to grow up with. (Of course, it's probably healthier than much of the processed junk food we eat here in the USA.)

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    1. Don't worry Al, no offence! I'm not a haggis fan. Tho is probably is quite healthy....

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  7. We had vegetarian haggis, and although really quite good, it was a little salty. Neaps and tatties with onion sauce as well. Being vegetarian now, I do miss the meat one, lungs and all!

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    1. The neaps and tatties and onion sauce alone would make a good meal. My mouth is watering!

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  8. I really like the idea of a Burns dinner. Haggis not so much. Is salmon considered an acceptable substitute? haha.

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    1. The rest of the trappings are a lot of fun, tho they do take a lot of stamina. Salmon would be my preference too.

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  9. Can't say I'm drawn to this menu! Ditto Al!!! But happy Burns supper to you!!!

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    1. Thank you - even tho we forgot to celebrate this year!

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  10. I've never heard of haggis...what is it exactly? I've never seen or heard of lamb lungs used as an ingredient...not to sure I would want too! LOL Call me one of those weird Americans! :)

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    1. Not sure you want to know, Kristie, but Wikipedia describes it as "a savoury pudding containing sheep's pluck (heart, liver and lungs); minced with onion, oatmeal, suet, spices, and salt, mixed with stock, and traditionally encased in the animal's stomach and simmered for approximately three hours. Most modern commercial haggis is prepared in a sausage casing rather than an actual stomach". I must be a weird Scot, because I'm not enthralled by it.

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  11. I'm not attracted to haggis, vegetarian or not...

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    1. We'll have to start a club, Christine.

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  12. I'm a fan, avoiding the small print. However having named the new puppy haggis, it's now a bit odd reading it on a menu. Possibly as alarming as reading 'lungs'

    Here's to a good year adventuring! Looking forward to reading your exploits

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