Caithness wind farm

Causeymire wind farm is one of a proliferation of wind farms in Caithness. Flat, exposed, empty land, 'enjoying' high wind speeds. Also home to one of the largest areas of blanket bog in the world, and on the tentative list for UNESCO World Heritage status. Previously home to neolithic people who left stone rows and chambered cairns.

Hill O Many Stanes

Caithness Archaeological Trust


Our short visit didn't give time for neolithic exploration, just windfarms. On our journey north it was dark by the time we reached the wind farm. The giant leg of a turbine looming out of the gloom just beside the road startled us as we drove by. I thought we had encountered a Tripod.

More skies from around the world, possible with wind farms, are at Skywatch Friday.

Comments

  1. There is great controversy her over wind farms - are they harmful to the health, to the wild birds, the aesthetics etc. I have to say your pics make them look majestic.

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  2. Beautiful shots of the wind mills in the open field.

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  3. Great photos! Never saw wind farms look this lovely. Gorgeous sky in the first shot.

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  4. Southern Alberta supports a vast number of wind turbines as it is an extremely windy part of the province. You see many wind farms in that region.

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  5. Caithness was also home to my grandfather. Lovely shot.

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  6. I love that first photo! Very nice sky capture.

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  7. The U.S. seems to be just discovering en masse the benefits of wind farms. Recently I saw three blades nestled in a harness on the back of their respective trucks apparently being transported somewhere wind-swept in New Mexico. I was amazed at the actual size of just one blade! Beautiful pictures, Linda! Thank you!

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  8. Lovely moody skies. It looks like a storm could be brewing, with those dark clouds lingering in the background.

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  9. Awesome captures and they do look great against skies! Hope you have a great weekend!

    Sylvia

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  10. What a fascinating history this land has. It looks very much like some of the high plains in eastern New Mexico, where there are wind farms, too.

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  11. Wow...
    grande questa energia elettrica !
    Buona serata :)
    Myriam

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  12. I visited a wind farm in Hawaii several years ago......fascinating!!

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  13. Nice shots of the wind farm and you chose a great time of year to photograph the turbines I think. :)

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  14. That's gorgeous! Sky shots at my end, please come and see.

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  15. Great captures of the cloud banks in the distant horizon...love the wind machines.

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  16. What beautiful photos, I especially like the first one! I'll have my Skywatch up later on.

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  17. Mixed feelings.
    Hate them but like what they do.
    Much prefer the stone remains from thousands of years ago, but apart from a cairn as a beacon on a hill top, they aren't much use now.

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  18. To be honest with you I'm not very keen on those windfarms, but your photos are really great!
    Greetings:)

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  19. Some people think these wind turbines are ugly. I don't subscribe to that thought, after all we live in the 21st Century.
    Great shots.

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  20. Funny you should reference triods - That was the first impression I had of them.
    This was the first windfarm on a site previously ravaged by commercial peat production. Now there are many more applications along the Causeway Mire.

    The hills in the background are the Scarabins. They used to be the dominating vertical feature of the whole region.

    The pylons along the A9 are connecting the winfarms in the area to the national grid and where demand is in the south.

    Still it might be considered an improvement on the fast breeder nuclear reactor project that is being wound down.

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  21. Unbelievable Linda, we posted photos on the same subject - wind mills/farm! Only, I posted one photo and yours a couple and they're awesome shots!

    I love your photos! YOu could check my solo wind farm photo!

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  22. Wonderful post! I love wind turbines. We have a lot of wind farms in the United States. And we usually see them when we drive back to my dad's since they live in Iowa on the plains.

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  23. I could feel the wind blowing strong! Beautiful!

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  24. What awesome landscape you captured there...and skies!

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  25. Beautiful photos! The windmills are a rear sight here in Norway, maybe because of our wild nature!? Have a nice weekend, all the best from Anette :)

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  26. Excellent shots!
    And thanks a lot for all the Links!

    These windmills are very important for our future ... let's save the planet ;-)

    Liebe Gruesse aus Hessen!

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  27. Those turbines have a grace and beauty all their own, although they look alien.

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  28. I think birds will evolve -- teach their offspring to avoid the windmills.
    Your photos are beautiful, and show the beauty of alternative energy sources. There are wind farms on the other side of Alberta, but not here. My neighbor recently put solar panels on his roof. This should be common here in the sunniest part of Canada, but instead it is unusual.

    Kay, Alberta

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  29. Beautiful SkyWatch posting!
    thank you for sharing this beautiful photo work


    Happy SWF! Have a good weekend,

    Regards, Bram

    My SkyWatch on WordPress

    Seen on Sky Watch Friday, Season 4, Episode 14

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  30. beautiful images...good to see all these clean energy being produced too!

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  31. Those wind farm photos are really neat, Linda!

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  32. Personally I love the look of wind farms and I love how close you can get to those at the Causeymire. I have a photo somewhere taken from a particular point along that road where you can get a wind turbine and a pylon look to be literally side by side - it's a strange image.
    Thank you for sharing such great images

    Linda

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